Arrow Head Types

As explained by Joe Snell

The arrowhead or projectile point is the primary functional part of the arrow, and plays the largest role in determining its purpose. Some arrows may simply use a sharpened tip of the solid shaft, but it is far more common for separate arrowheads to be made, usually from metal, horn, or some other hard material. Arrowheads are usually separated by function:

Bodkin points

are short, rigid points with a small cross-section. They were made of unhardened iron and may have been used for better or longer flight, or for cheaper production. It has been mistakenly suggested that the bodkin came into its own as a means of penetrating armour, but research6 has found no hardened bodkin points, so it is likely that it was first designed either to extend range or as a cheaper and simpler alternative to the broadhead. In a modern test, a direct hit from a hard steel bodkin point penetrated Damascus chain armour.7 However, archery was not effective against plate armour, which became available to knights of fairly modest means by the late 14th century.8

Blunts

are unsharpened arrowheads occasionally used for types of target shooting, for shooting at stumps or other targets of opportunity, or hunting small game when the goal is to stun the target without penetration. Blunts are commonly made of metal or hard rubber. They may stun, and occasionally, the arrow shaft may penetrate the head and the target; safety is still important with blunt arrows.

Judo points

have spring wires extending sideways from the tip. These catch on grass and debris to prevent the arrow from being lost in the vegetation. Used for practice and for small game.

Broadheads

were used for war and are still used for hunting. Medieval broadheads could be made from steel,6 sometimes with hardened edges. They usually have two to four sharp blades that cause massive bleeding in the victim. Their function is to deliver a wide cutting edge so as to kill as quickly as possible by cleanly cutting major blood vessels, and cause further trauma on removal. They are expensive, damage most targets, and are usually not used for practice.

There are two main types of broadheads used by hunters: The fixed-blade and the mechanical types. While the fixed-blade broadhead keeps its blades rigid and unmovable on the broadhead at all times, the mechanical broadhead deploys its blades upon contact with the target, its blades swinging out to wound the target. The mechanical head flies better because it is more streamlined, but has less penetration as it uses some of the kinetic energy in the arrow to deploy its blades.

Field tips

are similar to target points and have a distinct shoulder, so that missed outdoor shots do not become as stuck in obstacles such as tree stumps. They are also used for shooting practice by hunters, by offering similar flight characteristics and weights as broadheads, without getting lodged in target materials and causing excessive damage upon removal.

Target points

are bullet-shaped with a sharp point, designed to penetrate target butts easily without causing excessive damage to them.

Damage modifiers:

Bodkin points: Armor Piercing 2
Blunts: -2 damage
Judo points: only effective vs small game/birds (-3 damage)
Broadheads: Bleeding damage
Field tips: -1 damage
Target points: -1 damage

Medieval Bodkin, Target and Broadhead arrowheads.
Arrowheads

Modern Arrowheads
Target_arrowheads.png

Modern Broadheads
Modern_broadheads.png

Judo and Blunt Arrowheads.
Arrowheads2

Arrow Head Types

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